Tagged: Apple

New iWork apps have a new file format

iWork

When Apple released the new version of iWork, people immediately noticed the new icons, new interface, and the features that Apple inexplicably removed from previous versions. What most people didn’t notice is that Apple has a completely new file format. Drew McCormack offers his opinion on why Apple chose to change the iWork file format.

I tend to agree with him. Apple didn’t change the format just to be a stick in the mud.

Possibly the most important documents in Apple’s corporate history

“For $13,000 — $5,200 up front, and $7,800 on delivery, and no additional royalties — Shepardson Microsystems would build Apple’s first DOS. For its money, Apple would get a file manager, an interface for integer BASIC and Applesoft BASIC, and utilities that would allow disk backup, disk recovery, and file copying.”

It’s always fun to look back on computing history.

The iMac 27″ for graphic designers: part 2

27" Apple iMac

In part one of The iMac 27″ for graphic designers, I covered the reasons for choosing the late 2012 iMac 27” to replace my 2006 Mac Pro. As a graphic designer who works in Adobe Creative Suite apps all day long, with file sizes pushing the 1GB range, power is important. But as I found out with my MacBook Air, the Mac Pro just isn’t necessary anymore. Not only does the iMac have all the power you need, but it’s a much more elegant hardware solution, and significantly easier on the pocketbook. I also listed some of the pros and cons of the iMac.

Now I’m going to talk a bit about my experience actually using the iMac for the last two months. (more…)

Manually change the default interval of Apple’s Time Machine backups

Time Machine

By default, Apple’s Time Machine performs backups every hour. For many people, this simply isn’t necessary. And for those who actually do alter numerous files (especially large ones) every hour, your probably don’t want the system using resources for backups every hour.

Apple really should offer a way to adjust the backup time in the System Preferences, but they don’t. Fortunately, you can still do it using the Terminal app in your Utilities folder.

Open Terminal and paste the code below into the Terminal window and hit the Return key (make sure you copy the exact text below.) Enter your Admin password when it asks and hit return again:
sudo defaults write /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.backupd-auto StartInterval -int 7200

The number at the end of that line is the amount of seconds between backups. By default, it’s 3600 (one hour). In the code above, I have it set to two hours, but you can enter any amount of seconds you wish, such as 10800 for three hours, or 14400 for four hours, etc.

The iMac 27″ for graphic designers: part 1

After six years of using the original Mac Pro as my main workhorse, I finally took the plunge this past Christmas and upgraded to Apple’s latest 27” iMac. It’s the first Mac I’ve owned since the Quadra 650 back in the mid 90s that wasn’t a tower model. It was a scary decision for me, but one I’ve been delighted with so far.

iMac for designers

The first thing I had to come to grips with is the revelation that I don’t NEED all the expansion that the Mac Pro has to offer. In the distant past, the days when a 16GB stick of RAM took you a year or so to save-up for, the Mac tower models were the only way to go for pro designers. The desktop models simply weren’t made for people like us.

But times have changed. With NO exception, every Mac model available today can easily be used by the most demanding print and web designers—this includes the MacBook Air and the MacMini. If you think you NEED more, you’re most likely overestimating your needs. Today’s Macs are powerful enough for working with Gigabyte sized files with as little as 8GB of RAM.

Now I didn’t say that every Mac model is a perfect fit, far from it. And that’s where my decision got difficult. (more…)