Category: Links

Links to other sites

Free cloud-based font sharing webinar

Suitcase TeamSync
If you read my review of Extensis Suitcase Fusion 7 recently, you may recall I mentioned their new service called TeamSync, allowing you to share your fonts with a team of users, even if they aren’t Suitcase Fusion users (though they will be). If you discounted it because it sounded complicated, I urge you to take a look at this recently recorded webinar that sheds some light on TeamSync.

You’ll find out:
• The advantages of cloud-based font sharing;
• The differences between Suitcase Fusion and Suitcase TeamSync;
• How Suitcase Fusion and Suitcase TeamSync work together;
• How to quickly get your users connected;
• How to stay in sync by sharing your font library with multiple users.

The Suitcase TeamSync webinar is only an hour long, and does a fantastic job of showing you exactly how it all works.

Full-size wireless Apple keyboard… except it’s not from Apple

Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard
The standard full-sized Apple keyboard is probably the best keyboard I’ve ever used. I just wish it was wireless. Unfortunately Apple’s wireless keyboard, like almost every other wireless keyboard, jettisons the numeric keypad, navigation keys and extra F-Keys.

This is where the Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard (MWAK) comes in to save the day. The MWAK looks and acts just like the Apple Full Sized Keyboard, including the handy function keys to control your Mac. But there are three more things that make this thing a real gem.

First off, you can choose the MWAK color to match your device. It comes in Silver, Space Gray, Gold and Rose Gold. FINALLY, a full sized wireless keyboard for the Mac that offers black keys instead of white! What is it that makes manufacturers think that just because we’re Mac users we want want everything to be white? And it’s aluminum instead of the cheap plastic virtually all other keyboards are made of.

Matias keyboard colors

Next, you can sync the keyboard with up to four Bluetooth devices, including Android and Windows devices, and easily switch between them with the press of a button.

And finally, the 1,600 man battery is huge in comparison to other wireless keyboards. After a full charge (which can take up to 5 hours from empty), you can safely put the included USB charging cable in a drawer somewhere—because you won’t need it for another year. That’s right, a single charge will last you an entire year, according to Matias. And that’s with having the keyboard on and connected at all times (no delay in connecting to the host computer like most keyboards do).

The Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard sells for $99, and can be purchased directly or from numerous retailers.

I don’t own one of these Matias keyboards, so I can’t vouch for them in any way. What is the build quality? Do the colors match Apple devices accurately (or even close)? How does the keyboard feel compared to the Apple keyboards? I don’t know the answers to any of those questions because…

I would have run out to the Fry’s Electronics store down the street, but the website doesn’t list any products from Matias—despite the fact that the Matias website claims to sell the keyboard there. Same goes for BestBuy.

Inside the mill: How an Apple rumor gets made

Apple rumors

You’ve definitely heard an Apple rumor before. Like, maybe there won’t be a headphone jack on the next iPhone? Or that iTunes is getting a major overhaul. They come from “unnamed,” “well-placed,” “reliable” sources who are “familiar with the company’s thinking,” or a blurry factory photo of unknown origin.

How does a piece of information from one of the world’s most secretive companies materialize online? It’s a much more opaque process than you might expect.

If you’ve followed Apple rumors online for any amount of time, none of this has escaped your notice. That being said, the last several years have seen “legit” media outlets jumping into the game, and quoting these sites as fact. As for me, I’ve found that 90% of “rumors” are little more than common sense guesses based on technology and past actions by Apple. The rest, well… I just wait for the official announcements before I get too excited about anything.

Quick way to improve your resume

Start by framing your bigger picture before adding those smaller bullet points. Tell compelling before-and-after stories. Hiring managers will see what you have done — and can do for them. You’ll show how you’d improve their organizations, based on what you’ve done in the past.

I completely agree that telling a potential employer of specific actions you took that resulted in positive outcomes is much better than simply telling them your title and typical job duties.

Apple enters the energy business

Apple Energy

Apple’s Singapore solar project

Last week, Apple quietly dropped a bombshell in the energy industry, launching an entirely new subsidiary called Apple Energy that will manage the complexities of its renewable energy efforts.

What started out as simply “the right thing to do,” Apple is now seeking the ability to sell energy to end users and other companies. I don’t see Apple making a windfall from selling renewable energy, but the fact that they could essentially make a profit off their own energy use is, well… it’s typical Apple.

I think it’s awesome that Apple is doing this—no matter what the true reason—and I hope other companies follow.

Let’s talk color

Brands are built over time. In the beginning it’s important to simply target a color that will do three things:
• Resonate with your target audience
• Capture the emotion and tone of your brand
• Separate yourself from your competition

Print is still here, but it won’t save journalism

The cost of a full-page weekday ad in the print edition of the LA Times, reaching 500,000 people is about $50,000.

The cost of a ad on LATimes.com to reach the same 500,000 people is about $7,000.

The cost of an ad reaching 500,000 people that’s served up by Google and appears on LATimes.com can be as little as $20.

Looking at those figures, it’s easy to see why companies have all but moved completely to web-based advertising.

The problem is two-fold: First, when you pay for a subscription to a print product, you almost certainly read it… cover-to-cover. When you view web pages for news, you almost certainly either block the ads, or have grown so used to them that you don’t even see them. So while it’s cheaper to advertise on the web, it is my opinion that most companies are throwing their money away. They fall in love with social media shares/likes, click-through rates, page views, and a host of other analytics—but they fail to accept the only number that counts: sales!

The second problem is that due to the first, journalism has devolved into click-bait producing bloggers being paid $25 per post to “report the news.” They do this because they can’t afford to pay real journalists to investigate stories and spend time crafting something worth paying for. And because of that, I’m not willing to pay for it.

It’s a vicious circle.